Skip to content

What’s On at the Saturday Farmers Market in July

With summer fruit ripe & ready, our theme for July is stone fruits!

Person holding a wooden bowl of ripe peaches. Image: Kelly Neil on Unsplash
Image: Kelly Neil on Unsplash

Published on June 27, 2018

How sweet is the month of July? Very sweet, if you ask our fruit farmers! July in Southern Ontario is a great time to satisfy your sweet tooth with the delicious stone fruit in season.

Find your favourites or try some new varieties of fruits from Bizjak Farms (sustainably grown), Feast of Fields (certified organic), Niagara Lavender Farms (certified organic), and Oakridges Finest.

We are also excited to share some fantastic news from our Saturday Farmers Market community: Our friend & tenants at Ripple Farms won Startup Canada’s Ontario Social Enterprise of the Year Award!

From the Ripple Farms Team: “We would like to give a BIG thank you to everyone who has helped us during these last two years. We are sincerely grateful for this opportunity and for your continued support.”

Saturday, July 7 | Cherries

You might be familiar with the more common sweet cherry, but if tangy fruits are right up your alley, pick up some Morello cherries this week to give your tastebuds a zing. One of two sour cherry varieties, the ripe Morello cherry is a beautifully rich and dark mahogany colour.

Grabbed a basket and happen to see a crack in the batch? Take it as a sign to treat yourself! Cherries are very weather-susceptible, and are prone to cracking if there is too much rain or humidity during the ripening period. The water is absorbed through the cuticle (skin), and when combined with the accumulation of sugar within the fruit, it bursts like the crust of a cake does when baking. A crack does not mean the cherry is spoiled, it just means that is extra juicy!

If you plan to store them, keep the stems on and store in the refrigerator for up to one week, and do not wash them until you are ready to eat them.

Cherries in a basket. Image credit Katie Babcock.

Our market staff had the pleasure of visiting Bizjak Farms in June, when the delicious fruits were still growing green. How exciting that a few weeks later, they are ready for market! If you’re looking for a fun activity, why not head on up to their farm to pick some of your own? The Bizjak’s pick-your-own cherry trees open in July. Learn more about pick-your-own cherries at Bizjack Farms. 

Evergreen staff walking through fields at Bizjack Farms. Image credit Kelly Chan.

Music at the Market

Our market is blessed to have a robust community of buskers join us weekly, enhancing the market experience. We truly appreciate your contributions as our musicians fill the Pavilions with their melodies! Performing this week is Ethan Scott.

Saturday, July 14 | Raspberries

Believe it or not, raspberries can also be considered stone fruits. In addition to the more common red raspberry, there are also yellow raspberries too! This unique colour is a function of genetics! While humans produce melanin, which affects are skin and eye colour, raspberries produce anthocyanin, which affects red, blue, and purple pigmentation in fruits. Yellow raspberries do not produce as much anthocyanin, which is why the yellow colour shines through.

Keep your eyes peeled for yellow raspberries at Oakridges Finest! Sweeter and milder in flavour than the traditional red raspberry, yellow raspberries come in many varieties such as Fall Gold, Kiwigold, Golden Harvest, and Honey Queen. Ask Peter which ones he has brought to market and if you are lucky, you might be able to wrangle him into a great conversation about international development, too!

Interested in pairing yellow raspberries with something different? You can prepare yellow raspberries just like red raspberries, but we recommend trying something with vanilla notes. Try the recipe below, and top with golden raspberries!


Recipe: Very Raspberry Vanilla Custard

Vanilla raspberry custard.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups milk
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 pint raspberries, yellow and red mixed

Directions

  1. Have eggs ready in a bowl, and set aside where it will be within reach.
  2. Using a whisk, combine milk, sugar and cornstarch in a medium saucepan over medium heat on stovetop. Allow milk to scald (heat to the point when tiny bubbles form around edges of pan). Whisk occasionally to prevent cornstarch from clumping on bottom edges of pan.
  3. Remove milk mixture from heat.
  4. Mix about 2 tablespoons of scalded milk mixture into eggs using whisk, then introduce eggs into milk mixture in a slow stream, whisking milk mixture constantly.
  5. Immediately return pan to heat and whisk gently until custard thickens, another two or three minutes. Do not allow to boil. Sieve out egg strands if any formed.
  6. Remove pan from heat and stir in vanilla.
  7. Serve in a tea cup and top with raspberries.

Recipe adapted from Genius Kitchen.

Music at the Market!

Our market is blessed to have a robust community of buskers join us weekly, enhancing the market experience. We truly appreciate your contributions as our musicians fill the Pavilions with their melodies! Performing this week is David Chandross.

Saturday, July 21 | Apricots

Apricots are a great source of vitamin A, and are cultivated all on every continent except Antarctica! Apricot trees can be quite long-lived, with some living over 100 years. While we commonly eat the flesh of the fruit, if you crack open the pit, you can find an edible kernel (seed) within. They come in sweet and bitter kernel varieties, and must be roasted before consumption. This is because like most other stone fruit, they contain amygdalin, which releases cyanide when eaten by humans. While the sweet kernels contain very little amygdalin, the bitter kernels contain a lot more, and are poisonous if you consume more than a few a day.

If you are looking for another way to take your apricot out and about, dried apricots are a great source of iron. Try making an apricot fruit leather – it makes for an awesome outside treat for enjoying the amazing summer weather. If you are not in a rush, try drying it in the sun! It makes for a great snack that is both portable, kid-friendly, and delicious. 


Recipe: Apricot Fruit Leather

Apricot fruit leather Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 5 lbs ripe sweet apricots
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar or to taste

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 204˚C (400˚F).
  2. Rinse apricots, cut in half and discard pits.
  3. Place on a large baking sheet cut-side-up and bake at 204˚C (400˚F) for 15 minutes.
  4. Remove from oven and let cool until just warm enough to handle.
  5. Transfer to blender or food processor in batches and process until a smooth puree.
  6. Pour puree into a large mixing bowl. Add 1/2 cup sugar, or to taste and stir until sugar is incorporated.

How to Dry Fruit Leather with Sunshine

  1. Spread puree between 1/8” to 1/4” thick on a large parchment paper-covered baking sheet, extending the paper slightly past the rim. You will have enough puree for 3 large baking sheets.
  2. Set in the sunshine for 1 to 2 days, until no longer sticky when you poke the centers (store indoors uncovered overnight).

How to Make Fruit Leather in the Oven

  1. Turn down oven to 93˚C (200˚F).
  2. Spread puree between 1/8” to 1/4” thick on a large parchment paper-covered baking sheet, extending the paper slightly past the rim. You will have enough puree for 3 large baking sheets.
  3. Bake for 3 to 3 1/2 hours, until it no longer sticks to your fingers when you poke the center.
  4.  

    At room temperature, cut 3 cm thick slices and roll. Store at room temperature in an air-tight container.

Recipe by Natasha’s Kitchen.

Music at the Market!

Our market is blessed to have a robust community of buskers join us weekly, enhancing the market experience. We truly appreciate your contributions as our musicians fill the Pavilions with their melodies! Performing this week is Don Stevenson & Tim Bovaconti.

Saturday, July 28 | Peaches

Another stone fruit, peaches are a summertime favourite that are native to China and South Asia. Like many other stone fruit, peaches grow on trees. Although we tend to think of trees as very long-lived, the average life cycle of a peach tree is only 12 years!

Here in Canada, the yellow-fleshed peach is more common, and are another stone fruit rich in vitamin A. As the long weekend rolls around, they’re the perfect treat to pop on the grill! Added bonus? The recipe below could not be any easier. Pick a firmer, freestone peach for grilling, as the pits are easier to remove and will handle heat better.


Recipe: Grilled Cinammon Sugar Peaches

Grilled peaches with cinnamon and sugar. Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 stick unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 4 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 4 peaches, halved and pitted
  • Canola oil

Directions

  1. Heat grill to medium.
  2. In a small bowl, stir butter until smooth. Add cinnamon, sugar, and salt and mix until combined.
  3. Brush peaches with canola oil, grill facedown for 5 minutes, or until grill marks appear.
  4. Flip the peaches and cook for 4 minutes, until tender.
  5. Top with a brushing of the butter mixture and serve.

Recipe adapted from Bobby Flay at Food Network.

Music at the Market!

Our market is blessed to have a robust community of buskers join us weekly, enhancing the market experience. We truly appreciate your contributions as our musicians fill the Pavilions with their melodies! Performing this week is Joe Crawford.

Be sure to join us for the Saturday Farmers Market all month long! See What's On at Evergreen Brick Works this month, including the Sunday Artisan Market, Summer Wednesdays and more. 


Thank you to our generous Title Sponsor: Bank of America Merrill Lynch.